Media

The Big Read: Is this the year New Zealand finally addresses the gender pay gap? – Bay of Plenty Times, 20 March 2017
A study commissioned by the NZ Ministry for Women undertaken by researchers at Auckland University of Technology and the University of Waikato provides empirical evidence of a national gender pay gap between men and women.

Paula Bennett: It's 2017. It's time to pay women what they are worthstuff.co.nz, 8 March 2017
Closing the gender pay gap is one of my top priorities as Minister. We know that we won't eliminate the gap overnight. But it is simply unacceptable that women who are as productive, and contribute so significantly to business and the economy are paid less than men.

Gender pay gap not on, says Bennett – NZHerald.co.nz, 8 March 2017
She said research released yesterday by the Auckland University of Technology showed that about 20 per cent of the gap could be attributed to known traditional factors such as difference in occupations and differences in the amount of experience, and qualifications.

Greens want govt to back equal pay bill – Nznewswire, 8 March 2017
Research from Auckland University of Technology, released on Monday, showed unconscious bias was to blame for 80 per cent of the reasons women are paid less than men.

Bennett urges gender pay audit – Otago Daily Times, 8 March 2017
An Auckland University of Technology report said yesterday those traditional excuses actually made up just 20% of the reasons Kiwi women earned, on average, 12% less than men.

Gender pay gap prompts huge response – and it’s not just about the money – Stuff.co.nz, 8 March 2017
The ground-breaking research, conducted by Auckland University of Technology, says 80 per cent of the pay gap can be attributed to "unexplained" factors like conscious and unconscious bias, perception and attitude towards women.

Gender pay gap: New Zealand women share stories of bias at workstuff.co.nz, 8 March 2017
Groundbreaking research, conducted by Auckland University of Technology, says 80 per cent of the pay gap can be attributed to "unexplained" factors like bias, perception and attitude towards women.

'Women's work' does not explain much of the pay gapNZ Herald, 8 March 2017
International Women's Day today draws attention to a number of issues, especially the persistent statistical gap in the average earnings of men and women.

‘Unconscious bias’ to blame for gender pay gap – NewstalkZB.co.nz, 7 March 2017
Auckland University of Technology says those traditional excuses actually make up just 20 per cent of the reasons Kiwi women earn, on average, 12 per cent less than men.

NZH Focus: Gender Pay Gap still a problemNZ Herald, 8 March 2017
Today is International Woman’s Day and to mark it, the Human Rights Commission has released a project showing that over a lifetime, women earn on average $600,000 less than their male counterparts. Belinda Henley is joined by Charlotte Haycock from the Human Rights commission to discuss why the gender pay gap still exists.

There is a glass ceiling for women in New Zealand: Minister for Women – Morning Report, Radio NZ, 8 March 2017
The Minister for Women, Paula Bennett, says gender bias does exist and employer's sometimes think they can get away with paying women less.

We need to talk about New Zealand's gender pay gapIdealog, 7 March 2017
Misogyny is still, unfortunately, alive and well in the Land of the Long White Cloud – and there’s some hard data to back that up. But efforts are ongoing to bring us closer to full equality.

Bias behind 80 per cent of Gender Pay Gap – RadioNZ.co.nz, 7 March 2017
Professor Gail Pacheco authored the research, and she is a professor in Economics at AUT, the director of the New Zealand Work Research Institute.

Gender pay gap still stuck at 12 percent – RadioNZ.co.nz, 7 March 2017
The pay gap between men and women remains at 12 percent, according to the research, undertaken by Auckland University of Technology for the Ministry for Women.

The gender pay gap: 'Unexplainable factors' to blameNewshub. 7 March 2017
Women are consistently still paid less than their male counterparts and it's a result of both conscious and unconscious bias against women in the workforce, new research says.

Gender Bias blamed for most of static pay gap between men and women – Checkpoint, Radio NZ, 7 March 2017
The research found 80% of the gender pay gap cannot be explained.

Mind the gap – Jesse Mulligan, Radio NZ, 7 March 2017
Reasons behind the gender pay gap have been revealed.

Alison Mau looks at the gender pay gap in NZ – RadioLIVE.co.nz, 7 March 2017
Today on RadioLIVE Drive Alison Mau will focus on the gender pay gap in NZ, after AUT research released today showed women across the board are paid 12% less than their male counterpart, and in higher paying jobs, the figure jumps to 20%.

Unconscious bias blamed for gender gap – Nzcity.co.nz, 7 March 2017
Auckland University of Technology says those traditional excuses actually make up just 20 per cent of the reasons Kiwi women earn, on average, 12 per cent less than men.

NZ's gender pay gap hasn't improved in 14 years1 News, 7 March 2017
Women's Minister Paula Bennett has come out swinging, blaming bias in the workforce for the gap. New research by Professor Gail Pacheco looked at the factors behind it.

According to new research from AUT for the Ministry of Women’s Affairs, gender bias is the main reason for the wage gap – RadioNZ.co.nz, 7 March 2017
According to new research from AUT for the Ministry of Women’s Affairs, gender bias is the main reason for the wage gap.

Paula Bennett disappointed at the findings of new research on pay equityRadio Live, 7 March 2017
Women’s Minister Paula Bennett has today expressed disappointment at the findings of new research which shows bias and perceptions about women in the workplace are what’s driving the Gender Pay Gap.

Paula Bennett slams gender pay gap – HRMonline.co.nz, 7 March 2017
The report – conducted by the Auckland University of Technology on behalf of the Ministry for Women – was commissioned in a bid to identify the major drivers behind New Zealand’s pay gap, which has remained at roughly 12 per cent for the last 10 years.

Women's minister challenges companies to conduct gender pay audits and to declare the resultsNZ Herald, 7 March 2017
Deputy Prime Minister Paula Bennett said research released today by the Auckland University of Technology showed that about 20 per cent of the gap could be attributed to known traditional factors such as difference in occupations and differences in the amount of experience, and qualifications.

NZ gender pay gap unchanged in more than a decadeNBR, 7 March 2017
The gap between what men and women are paid on average has barely shifted in the 14 years since the first major attempt to measure the difference was published in 2003, a new report from the Ministry for Women has found.

Bias against women accounts for 80 per cent of gender pay gap - researchstuff.co.nz, 7 March 2017
The gender pay gap very much exists in New Zealand, and the cause of it is mostly down to bias, perception and attitude, according to new research.

Row over 'Gypsy' to promote fairNZHerald.co.nz, 5 March 2017
AUT University Professor of Diversity Edwina Pio, however, felt the best way forward was for the two groups to talk. "In the daily navigation of our lives we have to give a little, take a little and filter our reciprocity through honour, dignity and civility," she said.

Companies are vying for marketing and communications talent – stuff.co.nz, 5 March 2017
Auckland University of Technology professor Roger Marshall is noticing many students from other disciplines are trying to include marketing in their course work. "We have an internship programme, where every student in the school spends 10 weeks inside a company working on an issue. Marketing assignments are now the most common, although this wasn't true a few years ago," he said.

School performance key to later studyRadio NZ, 21 February 2017
The Tertiary Education Commission is making a new attempt at improving enrolment and pass rates among Māori and Pasifika students after institutions fell short of previous targets. among Māori and Pasifika. – Professor Gail Pacheco
Listen to the report from Morning Report.

Fewer Maori opt for degree studyWaatea News, 21 February 2017
Maori are 24 percent less likely to participate in bachelors degrees than Pakeha, according to a new study by the Productivity Commission and Auckland University of Technology. "Prior school performance is the largest contributing factor to the lower level of degree study, followed by parental education and socio economic status." – Professor Gail Pacheco

Ethnic and minority women face many different forms of discrimination in New ZealandThe New Zealand Herald, 14 February 2017
"Ethnic women sometimes faced 'triple discrimination' based on the simultaneous interlocking of their gender, ethnicity and minority migrant status." – Professor of Diversity, Edwina Pio

Refugee and immigrant millennials in NZ struggling to get into high-paying jobsThe New Zealand Herald, 14 February 2017
Despite having a better work ethic, refugee and immigrant millennials (RIM) still struggle to get good jobs in New Zealand, a study has found.

Pay rise for 120,000 Kiwis - but 1500 may lose their jobsThe New Zealand Herald, 24 January 2017
Officials have also calculated that the 50c an hour minimum wage hike will cost taxpayers an extra $29.4 million a year.

A long voyage: Refugees arrive home in AotearoaThe New Zealand Herald, 23 January 2017
"Refugees worked hard to achieve, but were at times misunderstood, overlooked or, at worst, exploited." – Professor Edwina Pio

Will a robot replace you?Nelson Mail, 2 January 2017
Everyone knows robots will eventually replace factory workers, but as technology advances, what other jobs might be done by machines?

Flexible working – Panacea or oxymoron?Employment Today magazine, December 2016/January 2017, Issue 206
Organisations and workers increasingly understand the benefits of flexible working, and the technology and infrastructure to make it happen are almost there, so what's the handbrake? The Trans-Tasman Telework Survey undertaken by the NZ Work Research Institute in 2013 found that, of 1800 staff across 50 Australian and New Zealand organisations, 89 percent worked remotely at least sometime during the working week.